What's the difference between invasion and occupation?

Invasion


Definition:

  • (n.) The act of invading; the act of encroaching upon the rights or possessions of another; encroachment; trespass.
  • (n.) A warlike or hostile entrance into the possessions or domains of another; the incursion of an army for conquest or plunder.
  • (n.) The incoming or first attack of anything hurtful or pernicious; as, the invasion of a disease.

Example Sentences:

  • (1) By presenting the case history of a man who successively developed facial and trigeminal neural dysfunction after Mohs chemosurgery of a PCSCC, this paper documents histologically the occurrence of such neural invasion, and illustrates the utility of gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance scanning in patient management.
  • (2) This study compared the non-invasive vascular profiles, coagulation tests, and rheological profiles of 46 consecutive cases of low-tension glaucoma with 69 similarly unselected cases of high-tension glaucoma and 47 age-matched controls.
  • (3) Implantation of the mouse embryo involves the invasion of the secondary trophoblast giant cells of the ectoplacental cone (EPC) into the uterine decidua.
  • (4) We have used a modification of the rotating-frame imaging technique to measure PCr-to-ATP ratio non-invasively in human heart.
  • (5) Thirty had an in situ tumor (mean age: 30 years) and 34 had an invasive adenocarcinoma (mean age: 45 years), 7 of whom died of their cancer.
  • (6) This case is unusual in that it demonstrated no malignant epithelium beyond that of a borderline tumor, but met the criteria of malignancy because of its invasiveness and metastasis.
  • (7) In invasive epidermoid carcinoma, the accuracy with the self-collected specimens approached the physician-scraped specimens.
  • (8) Rifampin is recommended as a prophylactic treatment for intimate contacts of young children who develop invasive infections with Haemophilus influenzae type B (Hib).
  • (9) It is concluded that the transcutaneous ultrasound technique provides a reliable, rapidly available, non-invasive method to confirm the diagnosis of deep vein thrombosis.
  • (10) Subsequent radiological follow-up demonstrated the rapid growth of the tumor hence exhibiting a very invasive form.
  • (11) The circle rate correlated with the extent of mural invasion.
  • (12) Minimal breast cancer should include lobular carcinoma in situ (lobular neoplasia) and ductal carcinoma in situ regardless of nodal status, and (tentatively) invasive carcinoma smaller than 1 cm in total diameter, if axillary lymph nodes are not involved.
  • (13) The diagnosis of meningeal cyst was confirmed in a non-invasive way by MRI showing a mass with the same signal intensities as CSF on both T1 and T2 weighted images.
  • (14) The carcinoma and lymphoma of the stomach were both small, and the depth of invasion was localized to the mucosa and submucosa, respectively.
  • (15) A transurethral prostatic resection for prostatism in a 73 year old man showed a cluster of richly capillarised clear cells originally thought to be indicative of invasive carcinoma.
  • (16) However, the typically deep invasion of the former tumors and their histologic features indicate that they are highly aggressive neoplasms.
  • (17) The presence of prostatic invasion either into the stroma or involving prostatic ducts and acini only had no adverse effect on outcome.
  • (18) Fifty-seven patients underwent local excision of an invasive distal rectal cancer as an initial operative procedure with curative intent.
  • (19) That most of the neoplasms found were adenomas and not invasive cancer may be due to the relative youth of most of those screened.
  • (20) At 24 weeks, 24-h mean blood pressures (MBP), measured invasively, were 121 mmHg (perindopril), 137 mmHg (captopril), 140 mmHg (hydralazine), 149 mmHg (isradipine) and 146 mmHg (metoprolol), compared to control values of 177 mmHg (SHR) and 132 mmHg (Wistar-Kyoto rats, WKY).

Occupation


Definition:

  • (n.) The act or process of occupying or taking possession; actual possession and control; the state of being occupied; a holding or keeping; tenure; use; as, the occupation of lands by a tenant.
  • (n.) That which occupies or engages the time and attention; the principal business of one's life; vocation; employment; calling; trade.

Example Sentences:

  • (1) The occupation of the high affinity calcium binding site by Ca(II) and Mn(II) does not influence the Cu(II) binding process, suggesting that there is no direct interaction between this site and the Cu(II) binding sites.
  • (2) For his lone, perilous journey that defied the US occupation authorities, Burchett was pilloried, not least by his embedded colleagues.
  • (3) The presently available data allow us to draw the following conclusions: 1) G proteins play a mediatory role in the transmission of the signal(s) generated upon receptor occupancy that leads to the observed cytoskeletal changes.
  • (4) In the German Democratic Republic, patients with scleroderma and history of long term silica exposure are recognized as patients with occupational disease even though pneumoconiosis is not clearly demonstrated on X-ray film.
  • (5) Medical prevention and technique and then compensation for these occupational nuisances are then described.
  • (6) Occupational income per patient was higher in intervention patients than in the usual care group in the 6 months after AMI ($9,655 vs $7,553).
  • (7) They derive from publications of the National Insurance Institute for Occupational Accidents (INAIL) and refer to the Italian and Umbrian situation.
  • (8) Being the decision-making agent, the rehabilitee must therefore be offered typical situational fragments of a possible educational and vocational future, intended on the one hand to inform him of occupational alternatives and, on the other, to provide initial experience.
  • (9) Bereaved individuals were significantly more likely to report heightened dysphoria, dissatisfaction, and somatic disturbances typical of depression, even when variations in age, sex, number of years married, and educational and occupational status were taken into account.
  • (10) Individual play techniques are explored, and two case histories are given as examples of how the occupational therapist works with the child, the family, and other practitioners.
  • (11) Fischer 344 rats and B6C3F1 mice were exposed for 2 years to vapors of tetranitromethane at concentrations below (0.5 ppm) and slightly above (2 or 5 ppm) the current U.S. recommended occupational exposure limit.
  • (12) Dynamics in the changes was established among the workers from the production of "Synthetic rubber and latex", associated with the duration of occupational exposure to styrene and divinyl.
  • (13) A multi-cancer site, multi-factor, case-referent study was undertaken to generate hypotheses about possible occupational carcinogens.
  • (14) As yet the observations demonstrate that workers exposed in their occupation to heavy metals (cadmium, lead, metalic mercury) and organic solvents should be subjected to special control for detection of renal changes.
  • (15) After controlling for age and cigarette smoking status, BMI was significantly related to education, income, occupation, and marital status in both men and women.
  • (16) As a university student in the early 1980s and a┬ápolitical journalist for most of the 1990s and beyond, I was aware of the issues surrounding Britain's continental occupation.
  • (17) Amphibole fibre counts were raised when compared with a non-occupationally exposed group and matched those seen in cases of pleural plaques, mild asbestosis, and mesothelioma.
  • (18) A questionnaire was presented to 2009 18--19 year old military recruitment candidates which enabled assessment of antipathy towards patients with severe acne vulgaris, the occupational handicap associated with severe acne and subjective inhibitions in acne patients.
  • (19) By using a cybernetic approach to occupational stress, it was hypothesized that the relationship between chronic work stressors and strain would be stronger among individuals high in private self-consciousness than among individuals low in private self-consciousness.
  • (20) An educational and occupational history was obtained for affected members of the Prader-Willi Syndrome Association (UK).